Prevea Health Blog

  • Feb. 12 to 18 is Random Acts of Kindness Week. Although we should exude kindness on others year-‘round, this week shines a light on it. Do you have an idea on how you can spread a little joy to someone you know, or better yet, a complete stranger? You, too, can spread some cheer while tying wellness into it.
  • Has anyone ever mentioned to you that they are fed up? They may be referring to the weather, a sports team or finances. One day, a few years ago, one of my friends asked me what I was fed up about?
  • Do you find yourself traveling a lot for work? What about on the weekends? Do you have children involved in sports on weekends so you are on the road... only to find yourself at the mercy of nearby restaurants? Fortunately, I know how to make healthy choices at restaurants and can share some “tricks of the trade” with you.
  • My recent blogs have been all about nutrition, but I wanted to talk about getting your fitness in good old Wisconsin weather.
  • As I child, I remember screaming, "time out!" as I was just about to get tagged … again. Being the youngest of six kids, I used that phrase a lot to avoid the inevitable. Do I still need those time outs? You bet I do. Do you take time outs when you need one?
  • Do you like to grocery shop? Are you the type to slowly wander down each aisle? Or, do you shop so fast that you create a tailwind? I am a bit embarrassed to say that sometimes, I enjoy grocery shopping more than shopping at the mall.
  • 10..9..8..7..6..5..4..3..2..1! Ready to make your New Year's Resolution? Below were some of the top resolutions from 2015...
  • You may have heard that saying before ... stressed is desserts spelled backwards. How are you dealing with the stress of the holidays?
  • Are you like me? Every year I promise myself that I will be ahead of schedule for the holidays. Now, Christmas is only 12 days away …
  • While pancreatic cancer is not discussed as commonly as other cancers present in the United States, it is actually more common than you realize.
  • The fall athletic season is about to start and the school year is not far behind. This can be a very difficult time for student-athletes. And this is when sleep becomes even more important.
  • You may have noticed two different titles for eye doctors: optometrists and ophthalmologists. There are quite a few different skill sets and specialties of each eye doctor.
  • Knee and hip replacement surgeries are advancing into the next generation of care. We are now exploring the concept of earlier mobility after surgery, ambulatory surgery and outpatient total joint surgery.
  • Pregnancy comes with many wonderful changes to your body. But along with all the happiness and excitement that pregnancy brings, there are also common pregnancy discomforts that most women encounter.
  • Back and neck pain, no matter the cause, usually is not “fixed” by surgery. In fact, statistics show that approximately 80 to 90 percent of people experiencing back or neck pain do not need surgery, as it will not impact the cause of the pain.
  • Do you experience pain that starts in your lower back and continues into your legs? When is it time to get assessed for ongoing lower back pain? If you answered ‘yes’ to any of these questions, you may have lumbar stenosis.
  • Although the number of women in the workforce in the U.S. surpasses the number of men, women continue to encounter the glass ceiling. There are several factors holding women back, and it is our responsibility as a community to work toward closing the gender gap.
  • An ear infection, also called otitis media, is one of the most frequent medical diagnoses for children. Learn the signs, symptoms and treatments of this, the second most common ailment in preschoolers.
  • You’ve likely heard about the Zika virus by now. The mosquito-borne virus has spread through nearly all of Central and South America. As a maternal fetal medicine physician at Prevea Health, it is part of my job – and my passion – to keep a close eye on any disease that could affect women who are pregnant or plan to get pregnant.
  • After breast cancer treatment, it is important to avoid tight clothing, jewelry, blood pressure cuffs, needle pricks, extreme temperature or pressure changes, sun burn, and scratches. Each could lead to a condition called lymphedema and/or cellulitis.
  • Cell phones and smart phones are everywhere you look. A recent study suggests that 74 percent of people worldwide own cell phones and use them primarily for texting. What can this increased cell phone use (texting) cause?
  • When people think of an athletic trainer, they typically think about sports, getting fit, or maybe injuries and the athlete’s road to recovery. The picture that comes to mind usually includes able-bodied athletes. However, wheelchair athletics is growing all over the nation.
  • In the past 10 years, concussions have become a hot topic not only at the professional level, but also at youth levels—especially in high-contact sports. With more research being conducted about the long-term effects of concussions, more information about how to better protect our brains has become available.
  • The main goal of hip replacement surgery is to improve a patient’s quality of life by relieving the pain associated with hip arthritis. It is among the most successful surgeries with a high return-to-an-active-lifestyle. The success of your surgery will depend largely on how well you follow your orthopedic surgeon’s instructions.
  • As we start to prepare for the holiday season may people begin to feel worn down and overwhelmed. Here are a few tips for maintaining both mental and physical health throughout this holiday season.
  • Yoga can help you feel physically stronger and mentally more relaxed. Learn about the added benefits of yoga, how it works and what you need to start a yoga program.
  • The life of a leader is filled with high levels of stress. And really, it’s no wonder that every leader, no matter what industry, is at risk for derailment.
  • Have you ever had the sudden onset of severe dizziness or feeling that the room was spinning? If so, you may have benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), one of the most common balance disorders.
  • In the past few years, sports participation has changed focus from sport diversification to sport specialization (deliberate practice is required to master the skills of a given sport). This may sound appealing, but is it the best approach for young athletes?
  • These days it seems as if every person I talk with has been touched by cancer, whether having personally gone through it or helping a loved one through it. Recently, I regrettably watched a close friend receive a cancer diagnosis and begin the early stages of treatment. It has made me stop and think about how much this person has touched my life.
  • How do you know this shoulder and upper arm pain is something serious and you need to see a doctor?
  • As students, we went into psychology because the brain is a fascinating organ. It controls everything in the body: how we think, how we act, our ability to move, our ability to breathe, and yet, it is the least understood organ in our body.
  • There are very few common illnesses that can make you feel quite as bad as the flu. Luckily, flu season occurs only once a year. But even one flu illness can be devastating for some patients.
  • It can be exciting for parents to watch their children venture into adulthood, whether it is into the military, to college or even across town to their own apartment. However, there can be other emotions mixed in with this excitement, as the reality of “empty nest syndrome” settles in.
  • That cool snap in the air and the rustle of leaves means it is time to talk about Halloween safety. Here are some things to consider as you venture out with your kids.
  • Tinnitus is the ringing, buzzing, humming or roaring sounds a person hears when no outside sound is present that nearly 25 million Americans experience in some form. Here are some signs, symptoms and treatment options for this auditory issue.
  • Do you ever feel like the only time you see your child is when they are either getting up or going to bed? Let’s discuss your child’s activity outside of school academics. How much is too much? Where do you draw the line?
  • ​We are often afraid of the unknown and that principle also applies to total knee replacement surgery. You might wonder, “How long will recovery take?” or “Will I be able to enjoy the activities I love?” Pam Buergi is here to answer those questions.
  • Many people with aching knees are told knee replacement surgery is an option. However, some put the procedure off because they are afraid of the post-surgery pain and recovery.
  • I am often asked when infants and toddlers can start learning how to swim. There is a huge difference between getting acquainted with the water, and actually learning safety and stroke skills. The American Academy of Pediatrics has stated that children younger than 4 are not developmentally ready for formal swimming instruction.
  • Life changes can be exciting and scary – difficult at times, but also fun. One of the biggest life changes many women face is having a child. Whether through birth or adoption, adding a child to your life is momentous.
  • Summer in Wisconsin is a great time of year for families to spend quality time together. Green Bay is full of fun, affordable activities for families during the summer months.
  • It’s time to dust off our biking equipment, running apparel sandals and flip flops. When thinking about fun summer activities, remember to also make healthy feet a priority.
  • The alarm clock goes off in the morning and you roll over to turn it off. As you attempt to sit up in bed, the room begins to spin and a sense of extreme nausea comes over you. You become quite anxious, as you’ve never experienced such dizziness. You begin to wonder, am I experiencing vertigo or something else?
  • Problematic toenails are a common problem I see on a daily basis. Sometimes it’s the how the toenails grow out and other times it’s caused by shoes and how we trim our nails. These helpful tips can help you avoid ingrown toenails.
  • With summer season in full swing, most of us are excited to periodically wear our favorite summer sandals. However, some of us with foot deformities, such as bunions, may not be as enthusiastic! If you’re not familiar with the term bunion, check out what Dr. Kachan has to say about it!
  • With both summer baseball and softball seasons in full swing, it’s time to revisit throwing injuries and safety. There are several different throwing injuries that can occur. My goal is to describe the most common injuries, and touch on how to treat and prevent them.
  • Spring is in full swing, with summer only one month away.You may be asking yourself why do car seats need to be recycled? Dr. Deuster has come up with some great answers to numerous car seat questions.
  • Wondering what types of appointments you will be having during your pregnancy? Dr. Metzler has come up with a list walking you through your typical nine-month schedule of appointments.
  • Have you ever thought of yourself as a hero? You could save the life of yourself or a loved one by knowing and recognizing the signs of a stroke.
  • Life sometimes requires you to go outside your comfort zone and trying new things. It wasn’t until I was challenged to run a half marathon that my thoughts on running changed.
  • Recently, a story about a young runner with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) went viral and offered many people an opportunity to learn a little more about this disease. So, we hear about it from time to time, but do most people really know what MS is?
  • Injuries are part of life when it comes to athletic activity and exercise in general. There are many risk factors that make injury during exercise more likely.
  • The risk of birth defects gradually increases throughout a woman’s 20s, 30s and 40s. However, the risk doesn’t jump up drastically at any particular age.
  • The snow has melted and cooped up Wisconsinites are eager to get outside and once again take part in outdoor exercise. When jumping back into a walking or running routine, it’s easy to push yourself too hard and put yourself at risk for injury.
  • I have been told so many times by patients that they “have their life back”, as they resume the activities their painful hips had previously denied them. We see people get back to walking, biking, cross-country skiing and even dancing without pain. It is so wonderful to be a part of this process!
  • My mom started asking about a wheelchair several years ago. First she wanted a scooter to take “Scruffy” for a walk, then she wanted a light wheelchair for when we went to the zoo or parks, and last year she started using a cane in her home. “Can I get a wheelchair?” she would ask me.
  • Over the years, I have seen many a fisherman; and even myself; slip, slide and fall on the ice. I now work in physical therapy and know why it is so important to tread carefully on the ice.
  • Many couples are asking themselves that very question at this very moment. How will you know you’re ready? What things should you consider before conceiving?
  • Did you know, approximately 25 percent of school aged children have vision problems? If the child is nearsighted, farsighted or has astigmatism, wearing corrective lenses may help in the classroom.
  • Whether you are weekend warrior or a gym rat, there was once a time when we too performed a variety of different primal movements in a perfect, textbook manner.
  • Total knee replacements are often done when non-surgical treatments — such as NSAIDS, exercises and cortisone injections —are unsuccessful. Replacement surgery is needed when the articular cartilage protecting the joint is worn away from years of arthritis.
  • January is Glaucoma Awareness Month, which provides a great opportunity to provide a bit more information the disease.
  • When days of formula and breast milk have ended, it can sometimes be a challenge to know if your toddler is really getting the nutrition he or she needs.
  • As you know, smoking affects many areas of the body. However, most people do not know how it affects the spine. People who smoke experience degeneration in their spine about ten to fifteen years sooner than someone who does not smoke.
  • You may be wondering, what is MyPrevea? Or, maybe you’ve heard of it, but aren’t sure how it works? Hopefully this blog will help address the common questions that I hear.
  • I remember the pride and the honor I felt to serve our nation’s best as they defended our cause overseas. What I didn’t realize as I touched down in this war torn area of the world, is how it would forever change me. It changed my perspective on war, on medicine, on my own mortality, and my relationship to complete strangers serving at my side.
  • The holiday season is always fun. It’s a time for family, friends and of course, food. For some kids and kids at heart, it’s a time when many indulge in a tasty adventure, my brother included.
  • As one of the Certified Nurse Midwives at Prevea Health, I talk to patients about birth control options every day. What most women don’t realize, is how many choices they have available to them. I feel it is really important to encourage women to be knowledgeable first, so that they can make the best decision for themselves and their lifestyle.
  • Two years ago, Prevea determined that we care for more than 10,000 obese children in our service area. In an effort to address these issues, we created Healthier Youth, a 12-week educational program designed to educate both children and their families about nutrition, fitness and behavior.
  • The PARADIGM-HF trial has already created a shift in the way we view heart failure management or a shift in Paradigm so to speak. We now have a very effective means of improving the quality of life and life expectancy of our sickest patients at a time, when we thought we had done all that is possible.
  • How many times have you moved the wrong way and felt a twinge in your back? Is it just a muscle strain that will go away in a couple of days or is it something more serious that could possibly require surgery?
  • Families, caregivers, charities and research groups across the United States observe September as Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. The objective is to put a spotlight on the types of cancer that largely affect children, draw attention to survivorship issues, and raise funds for research and family support.
  • Approximately 50 million Americans deal with some form of arthritis or a related disease that causes pain. Pain is our body’s signal that something is wrong. There are several changes you can make in your daily life to help you cope with arthritis pain and improve your lifestyle.
  • It was a great moment in my running career and the words my coach yelled to me have served me well in every phase of my life. Today, I am privileged to care for runners and athletes of all stripes as they strive, sweat, persevere and attack the sport of their choice.
  • Thinking back, I remember the start of each school year as an exciting, yet nerve wracking, time for me. I often asked myself, “will any of my friends be in my class this year and will I like my teacher?” Fortunately, there are a few steps parents can take to make back-to-school a positive and stress-free experience for their kids.
  • Like most parents, I found it hard to believe how quickly the first year had gone by. In the midst of arranging a first birthday party, I also needed to schedule her 1 year check-up with her pediatrician. How big will she be this time? When are we supposed to switch to the larger car seat? Is she growing and developing the way she’s supposed to?
  • How often do you hear someone complain about their sore knee, or maybe state that they can hardly walk due to all of the pain in their hip? This discomfort may be caused by arthritis.
  • Summer is finally coming. As the weather is warming up, I’m beginning to see kids in my neighborhood out and about on their bikes. But, this is also a reminder that accidents can happen anywhere, even in your own driveway. According to the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety, helmet use is estimated to reduce the risk of head injury by 85%.
  • When you think about the month of May you probably think about blooming flowers, fresh green grass, and gearing up for the first summer holiday! Here in Prevea Women’s Care, we also think about Women’s Health Week! What a perfect time to introduce Prevea’s newest blog coming straight from the providers who take care of women every day.
  • The drop is largely due to the fact that colon cancer is often preventable. More people are having colonoscopies, and regular colonoscopies can identify and remove pre-cancerous growths, called polyps, before they become an issue. The screening can also identify colon cancer in its early stages, when it’s easiest to treat.
  • While the vaccination schedule can vary slightly, I know my daughter will be getting two new vaccines this well child visit; vaccines, that in the last few years, have stirred up quite the debate across the Internet: MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) and varicella (chicken pox).
  • As a health care organization, our true focus at Prevea is on the health of our community. While the majority of a physician’s training throughout medical school is on helping an individual patient when he or she is sick or injured, we are also armed with the tools and knowledge needed to help keep our patients healthy in the first place.
  • Several months ago, I came home from work to reports that my then eight-month-old daughter had been crabby all day. That in itself wasn’t completely unusual; although she usually is a very happy baby, everyone has crabby days. When I picked her up for some much needed snuggles, I noticed that she felt warm—much warmer than usual.