Prevea Health

LSVT BIG® and LSVT LOUD®

 
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Movement and communication disorders caused by Parkinson’s disease or other neurological conditions have a profound impact on a person’s life. The disorders not only change muscle function, but they also can change a person’s perceptions of voice and movement.

If your life, or the life of a loved one, has been affected by a neurological condition, consider Lee Silverman Voice Treatments (LSVT). The targeted and repetitive exercises of LSVT BIG® and LSVT LOUD® have been helping patients regain mobility and restore voice quality since 1987.

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LSVT therapy takes advantage of the brain’s natural ability to change, adapt and create new neural connections. When a person overlearns the repetitive big movements or loud vocalizations practiced during LSVT treatment, the brain’s neuroplasticity reorganizes the information to create new motor-skill and language memories.

The program requires commitment. A person participating in LSVT treatment will complete research-proven, high-effort exercises and functional tasks for 60 minutes during each session. On average, four sessions are scheduled each week for four consecutive weeks. The intensive targeted exercises are accompanied by daily homework assignments that incorporate similar activities. In order to be effective, patients must commit to attending all sixteen training sessions and doing the prescribed homework.

Learning to speak louder or move bigger helps people with sensory misperceptions recalibrate their efforts to perform in real-world situations.

Individuals who complete the entire program often enjoy a higher quality of life: shuffling becomes walking and unrecognizable speech becomes understandable conversation.

Find a doctor to schedule an appointment. 
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